CIVICA ESR
COURSE CATALOGUE

02 December 2021

The London School of Economics and Political Sciences

Writing Progress Day

This online workshop gives participants the opportunity to think about their approach to writing in a quiet and supported way This online workshop gi...

This online workshop gives participants the opportunity to think about their approach to writing in a quiet and supported way This online workshop gives participants the opportunity to think about their approach to writing in a quiet, structured and supportive atmosphere. The workshop will be facilitated by Pam Lock from the University of Bristol, who has experience as a researcher and a retreat leader. The day is broken down in to carefully planned blocks of writing, some short, some long, so that participants can explore different approaches and discover which they prefer. The six-hour workshop enables participants to · set short term goals for a day’s writing and monitor their progress against the goals, · experience the value of short bursts of free writing, · experiment with different lengths of writing time, to see which suit them best, · get ahead with a writing project, particularly if this project has ‘got stuck’, and · discover the value of building stretching exercises into a normal daily work pattern. Participants need to arrive 'ready to write' and need to bring any materials (books, data). There will be some short discussions on good writing practice and how to approach your writing as a professional task but the vast majority of the day will be devoted to writing without distraction. To this end, there will be no internet, no mobile phones, during the writing periods.
Teachers:
  • Pam Lock ()
Entry requirements: N/A
Assessment: N/A
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Online
02/12/21 - 02/12/21
Reg. deadline: 01/12/21
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 1

06 December 2021

The London School of Economics and Political Sciences

Optimise your Virtual Presence

This workshop focuses on getting you comfortable with virtual meetings so that you can maximize your virtual presence. We explore some of the technica...

This workshop focuses on getting you comfortable with virtual meetings so that you can maximize your virtual presence. We explore some of the technical aspects of virtual delivery, including lighting, backgrounds, and how to make the camera your friend. We also look at how to use other tools at your disposal - such as your voice and your words - to help ensure that you come across as confident and engaging.
Teachers:
  • Delia Lloyd ()
Entry requirements: N/A
Assessment: N/A
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Online
06/12/21 - 06/12/21
Reg. deadline: 06/12/21
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 1
Hertie School

PhD Panel on “China and the European Union: Between Cooperation and Competition”

In the last years, China has become Europe’s major trading partner. The rise of China has generated important challenges to EU’s commercial and diplom...

In the last years, China has become Europe’s major trading partner. The rise of China has generated important challenges to EU’s commercial and diplomatic approach with the Asian country. One the one hand, critics argue that the EU has made insufficient steps to ensure a level playing field with China’s Digital Silk Road initiative, in a time when major EU’s economics (like Germany) are still lagging behind. On the other hand, observers argue that EU’s commercial initiative is increasingly disconnected from ensuring the promotion of human rights, and/or promoting online freedom of speech with its trade partners. Considering these challenges, the present panel aims at reflecting on tensions between China and the EU commercial and diplomatic relationships. Presenters • Nora Kürzdörfer, PhD researcher at the Berlin Graduate School for Global and Transregional Studies • Felix Garten, PhD candidate at the Berlin Graduate School for Global and Transregional Studies • Position Discussants • Dr. Elisa Gambino, Fellow in International Relations at the LSE • TBC
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Register to course
Online
06/12/21 - 06/12/21
Reg. deadline: 04/12/21
Credits: 1
N° of Sessions: 1
European University Institute

Regulatory Competition and Harmonisation in Commercial Law 

Regulatory competition and harmonisation are key points of discussion in many areas of commercial law. The debate in regulatory competition often take...

Regulatory competition and harmonisation are key points of discussion in many areas of commercial law. The debate in regulatory competition often takes the situation in company law as a starting point (notably, the ‘Delaware effect’ in the US and the situation following the ‘Centros’ case in the EU); yet, degrees of regulatory competition are also prevalent in many other areas of commercial law, such as contract, insolvency and securities law. The alternative approach seems to be to propose the harmonisation (or unification) of the law; yet, there is also the further complication that some harmonisation (notably, on topics of conflict of laws) may actually stimulate regulation competition. This seminar will discuss the main arguments in favour and against regulatory competition and harmonisation in commercial law (broadly understood). This may appeal (i) to researchers in areas of law such as contract, company, insolvency and securities law and (ii) to researchers in other fields with an interest in regulatory competition and harmonisation. The seminar consists of ten teaching hours, five on 6 December and five on 14 December. Further details on the format and substance of the seminar can be found in the seminar guide which can be requested by sending an email to mathias.siems@eui.eu.
Teachers:
  • Mathias Siems (European University Institute)
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
06/12/21 - 14/12/21
Reg. deadline: 26/11/21
Credits: 3
N° of Sessions: 4

08 December 2021

Hertie School

PhD Panel on “The European Union, NATO and the Transatlantic Cooperation: Prospects and Challenges”

The security order of the political West is increasingly tested, both internally and externally. Illiberal tendencies within member states of importan...

The security order of the political West is increasingly tested, both internally and externally. Illiberal tendencies within member states of important institutions of this order, such as NATO and the European Union, make it more and more difficult to strive for a common goal. Domestic and international terrorist threats and the challenges stemming from global migration flows add to the uncertainty. In addition, Europe has seen multiple crises erupt in its immediate neighbourhood, while the U.S. prepares for great power competition with China. All these developments take place against the backdrop of a decreased willingness to intervene abroad after the highly contested missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Libya. This panel will discuss the challenges and prospects of the Western security order pertaining to the EU, NATO, and transatlantic cooperation. Presenters • Alexander Sorg, PhD researcher at the Hertie School • Position vacant, please apply Discussants • Dr. Emmanuelle Blanc, Fellow in International Relations at the LSE • TBC
Entry requirements: none
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Register to course
Online
08/12/21 - 08/12/21
Reg. deadline: 06/12/21
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 1

10 January 2022

Hertie School

Introduction to Teaching in Higher Education (Dr. Annika Zorn)

The course introduces participants to the theory and practice of teaching in higher education. They can apply what they have learned in practical exer...

The course introduces participants to the theory and practice of teaching in higher education. They can apply what they have learned in practical exercises, for example through individual teaching sessions. You will receive a certificate of attendance upon successful completion of all course requirements. Please only register if you are certain to be able to attend all sessions! To participate, you will have to attend all sessions of the course and at least one micro-teaching day. Course: Monday 1o January to Friday 14 January 2022, from 2pm- 6pm. Micro-teaching sessions: Tuesday 18 January and/ or Wednesday 19 January 2022, 9am – 5pm (with lunch and coffee breaks). A small pre-course task has to be sent by 7 January 2022 noon. The course requires participants to submit a course design - which you will start to work on already during the course - by 13 February 2022. For any questions, please write to phd-team@hertie-school.org. Please find more info on contents and target group on this website: https://www.hertie-school.org/en/docgov/phd-workshops/introduction-to-teaching-in-higher-education
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Online
10/01/22 - 19/01/22
Reg. deadline: 30/11/21
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 6
European University Institute

Politics and Constitutionalism in East Central Europe

This seminar studies the post-1989 political and constitutional transformations in East Central Europe (ECE). It pursues the three main objectives. Fi...

This seminar studies the post-1989 political and constitutional transformations in East Central Europe (ECE). It pursues the three main objectives. First, the seminar aims to understand and assess the transformations’ outcomes. Through the lenses of the aspirations from the early 1990s, what have been the successes of the transformations, and which are the failures? What factors have contributed to the different paths taken within the region? What has been the role of historical legacies? The seminar’s second objective is to identify the potential specificities and idiosyncrasies of political processes in ECE. Is party competition structured by the same conflicts as in the West? What explains the high levels of party volatility? Do ECE citizens stand out in terms of their political participation? Finally, the seminar seeks to investigate the causes of the democratic erosion that ECE has experienced in recent years. Why is the liberal democratic constitutional order increasingly being challenged in the region? Do citizens in ECE value democracy less than their Western counterparts? Is there a way back to the original ideals of the constitutional transformation? And what could be the role of the internal and external supporters of a liberal democratic order?
Teachers:
  • Gabor Halmai (European University Institute)
  • Filip Kostelka (European University Institute)
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Register to course
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
10/01/22 - 21/03/22
Reg. deadline: 15/12/21
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 8
Central European University

Beliefs in Psychology and Economics

Syllabus: https://courses.ceu.edu/sites/courses.ceu.hu/files/attachment/course/6428/beliefsinpsychologyandeconomics.pdf Content. This course will...

Syllabus: https://courses.ceu.edu/sites/courses.ceu.hu/files/attachment/course/6428/beliefsinpsychologyandeconomics.pdf Content. This course will explore ways to integrate insights from psychology into economics, formalizing these insights by extending existing economic models, and reviewing the evidence in the lab or field for these models. In terms of methodology, the course focuses on formal models: how to turn evidence from psychology into formal models and deriving their implications in economic settings. In terms of content, the course focuses on beliefs: how to measure people’s beliefs; how people update their beliefs; and situations where people may derive direct utility from their beliefs, not just from the actions they take based on those beliefs. Moreover, the beliefs we study include beliefs over the outside world as well as about one’s own past and future behavior. How dangerous is smoking? How much time did I spend on YouTube last week? How much will I work out next week? In addition to formal analysis, students will collect measurements on beliefs, starting with their own beliefs Relevance. The course covers the same topics and questions as Behavioral Economics and Beliefs, but aims to prepare students for research in economics, and as such focuses on formal rigour in modeling and statistical analysis. Therefore the course can only be taken for credit for students who have taken (at least) a graduate course in microeconomics (although everyone is welcome to audit the course and participate actively in the classes). Due to more time spent on formal modeling, there is less time for applications. Students interested in doing research in economics should take this class rather than Behavioral Economics and Beliefs. Learning Outcomes: Key outcomes. By the end of the course, students will learn how to extend the classical economic framework by formally modeling insights from psychology, especially regarding beliefs; learn how to apply these models to specific contexts to draw out new implications and make (falsifiable and often falsified) predictions; be exposed to (a small subset of) the frontier of research on beliefs in behavioral economics; and gather research ideas. Assessment: Assessment may change by Winter 2022. Grading will be based on the total score out of 100, in line with CEU’s standard grading guidelines. 1 One Problem Set (30%): 25% for each problem set, 5% extra for problem 0 and for self-grading of each problem set. See problem-set-policy.pdf on Moodle. 2 Research Ideas (20%): see research-ideas.pdf on Moodle. 3 Exam (50%): The exam will be an exam in the last class. Prerequisites: A graduate course in microeconomic theory.
Teachers:
  • Marc Kaufmann (Central European University)
Entry requirements: A graduate course in microeconomic theory.
Assessment: Assessment may change by Winter 2022. Grading will be based on the total score out of 100, in line with CEU’s standard grading guidelines. 1 One Problem Set (30%): 25% for each problem set, 5% extra for problem 0 and for self-grading of each problem set. See problem-set-policy.pdf on Moodle. 2 Research Ideas (20%): see research-ideas.pdf on Moodle. 3 Exam (50%): The exam will be an exam in the last class.
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
10/01/22 - 01/04/22
Reg. deadline: 15/12/21
Credits: 4
N° of Sessions: 12
Central European University

Governing through Financial Markets

Syllabus: https://courses.ceu.edu/sites/courses.ceu.hu/files/attachment/course/6427/governingthroughfinancialmarketssyllabuswinteray2021-2022.pdf S...

Syllabus: https://courses.ceu.edu/sites/courses.ceu.hu/files/attachment/course/6427/governingthroughfinancialmarketssyllabuswinteray2021-2022.pdf Schedule: http://schedules.ceuecon.org/econ-phd This course brings students to the current research frontier in corporate governance and financial markets. While motivated by empirical patterns and stylized facts, the course will deal with the theory of corporate governance. The course prepares you to understand and critically evaluate research in the area and provides guidance to develop first ideas for contributions to the corporate governance literature. The course will draw a particular focus on the interaction of financial markets and corporate governance. Covered topics include but are not limited to takeovers, private equity, shareholder voting and vote trading, and the role of institutional investors. The course contains a mix of lectures, paper discussions, and student presentations. Learning Outcomes: By the end of the course, students will be able to: · understand the governance challenges modern firms face · know how financial markets can mitigate but also aggravate these challenges · be able to critically evaluate new governance regulation · understand the development of corporate governance and the impact of financial markets · know the different governance channels as well as their pros and cons Assessment: The assessment will be passed on participation, the student presentation and the term paper (research proposal). Letter grades will be assigned following departmental guidelines. The weights on different parts of the class are: Participation 10% Term paper 50% Presentation 40%
Teachers:
  • Paul Voss (Central European University)
Entry requirements: Financial Economics
Assessment: The assessment will be passed on participation, the student presentation and the term paper (research proposal). Letter grades will be assigned following departmental guidelines. The weights on different parts of the class are: Participation 10% Term paper 50% Presentation 40%
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Register to course
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
10/01/22 - 01/04/22
Reg. deadline: 15/12/21
Credits: 4
N° of Sessions: 12

24 January 2022

National University of Political Studies and Public Administration

Trust and cooperation. Theory and methods in cognitive sciences

Cooperation is fundamental to the human species and trust makes for better societies. Yet why do we so often fail to cooperate and why is there so muc...

Cooperation is fundamental to the human species and trust makes for better societies. Yet why do we so often fail to cooperate and why is there so much distrust between various individuals and social groups? This course proposes an evolutionary-cognitive perspective upon these phenomena, from theoretical models to interdisciplinary methodological approaches. What is cooperation, and what is special about human cooperation? How do certain social contexts and individual inclinations create the conditions for reciprocity or mutualism? How do people think and act about others as partners in social interactions? What methods can we use to study trust and cooperation in real life or experimental settings?
Teachers:
  • Lou Safra (Sciences Po)
  • Mia Karabegovic (Central European University)
  • Radu Umbres (National University of Political Studies and Public Administration)
Entry requirements: The course is open to PhD students and postdoc researchers in sociology, anthropology, psychology, political sciences, administration, public policy, economics.
Assessment: written project
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Register to course
Online
24/01/22 - 20/02/22
Reg. deadline: 15/01/22
Credits: 10

01 February 2022

European University Institute

EU Justice

The seminar examines the responsibility of the EU as an agent of justice and the kind(s) of justice the EU ought to deliver. It discusses the main the...

The seminar examines the responsibility of the EU as an agent of justice and the kind(s) of justice the EU ought to deliver. It discusses the main theories of EU justice (including Rawlsian justice, justice as solidarity, access justice and the right to justification) in connection to salient contexts of (in)justice shaped by EU law, such as citizenship, internal market, consumer protection, competition, climate).
Teachers:
  • Martijn Hesselink (European University Institute)
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
01/02/22 - 15/02/22
Reg. deadline: 10/01/22
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 5

09 May 2022

Central European University

Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA): Performing Basics and Advanced Analyses using R

PLEASE NOTE: CEU students should register at CEU (through SITS), not through CIVICA ESR Course Catalogue. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a methodologi...

PLEASE NOTE: CEU students should register at CEU (through SITS), not through CIVICA ESR Course Catalogue. COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a methodological course on set-theoretic methods for the social sciences. While the spectrum of a set-theoretic methods is broad, including techniques such as Mill’s methods or typological theory, this course primarily focuses on the crisp-set and fuzzy-set versions of Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA). Invented by Charles Ragin [1987], this technique is still undergoing modifications, improvements, and ramifications. These methods are applied in fields as diverse as political science, public policy, international relations, sociology, business and management studies, or even musicology (see www.compasss.org). This course aims at enabling students to produce a publishable QCA of their own. In order to achieve this, this course provides both the formal set theoretical underpinnings of QCA and the technical and research practical skills necessary for performing a QCA. All applied parts of the course will be performed in the R software environment, using RStudio (Cloud). The course is structured as follows. We start with some basics of formal logic and set theory. Then we introduce the notions of sets and how they are calibrated. After this, we move on to the concepts of causal complexity and of necessity and sufficiency, show how the latter denote subset relations, and then learn how such subset relations can be analyzed with so-called truth tables. We learn how to logically minimize truth tables and what the options for the treatment of so-called logical remainders are. Once students master the current standard analysis practice, we discuss several extensions and possible improvements of QCA. Depending on the needs and interests of participants, we choose several topics from the following list: set-theoretic multi-method research, i.e. the combination of QCA with follow-up within-case analyses; the integration of time into QCA; theory-evaluation in set-theoretic methods; or QCAspecific procedures for robustness tests. Since this is an advanced PhD course, students who plan to attend should first check for themselves and, in case of doubt, with me whether they fulfill the following requirements: Participants should have (a) some practical experience in empirical comparative social research; (b) undergone some thorough courses in basic research methodology; and (c) preferably some basic statistical training, or at least hands-on knowledge with some sort of spreadsheet programs (even if it is just Excel). The core readings of the course are Schneider and Wagemann [2012] and Oana et al. [2021]. Students who wish to take the course and need more information as to what the course is about are invited to skim through the first chapters of these books. From the beginning, we will use specialized software for performing the analytic steps learned in class. We will use R [R Core Team, 2020] and RStudio [RStudio Team, 2020] and within it, the packages QCA [Dusa, 2018] and SetMethods [Oana and Schneider, 2018]. A desired (and very likely) side effect of this course will be that participants not only increase their proficiency in R, but also that we engage into discussions on more general methodological issues of good comparative research, such as principles and practices of case selection, concept formation, measurement validity, and forms of causal relations.
Teachers:
  • Carsten Schneider (Central European University)
  • Nena (Ioana-Elena) Oana (European University Institute)
Entry requirements: a) practical experience in empirical comparative social research; (b) undergone some thorough courses in basic research methodology; and (c) basic statistical training/hands-on knowledge with a spreadsheet program
Assessment: Participation during synchronous meetings, including R coding exercises 20% Engagement with readings on Perusall 10% Quizzes 20% Homework R coding assignments 5% Final paper 45%
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Register to course
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
09/05/22 - 20/05/22
Reg. deadline: 02/05/22
Credits: 8
N° of Sessions: 10