CIVICA ESR
COURSE CATALOGUE

09 January 2024

European University Institute

Causal inference

The objective is to learn how statistical methods can help us to draw causal claims about phenomena of interest. Participants will be introduced into ...

The objective is to learn how statistical methods can help us to draw causal claims about phenomena of interest. Participants will be introduced into an authoritative framework of causal inference in social sciences, i.e. the potential outcomes framework.
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
09/01/24 - 12/03/24
Reg. deadline: 07/12/23
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 10
European University Institute

Law and Technology

The ambition of this course is to broadly discuss the evaluation and regulation of technology. The course explores the field of “law and technology” i...

The ambition of this course is to broadly discuss the evaluation and regulation of technology. The course explores the field of “law and technology” in legal scholarship, its history, epistemology, ontology, and axiology. The course discusses issues such as when there is a “need for law” (Tranter, 2011), the “regulability” of technology, regulatory pacing, “compartimentalization” of legal approaches, cyberlaw, lawmaking by courts v legislatures, and moral objections to technology. The course encompasses technology in a wide sense that is digital, mechanical, material and chemical technology. Legal history will also be looked at to discuss innovations like the printing press, radio broadcasting and automation. The course is relevant to many specific fields of law, like constitutional and administrative law, free speech, liability law, intellectual property, privacy protection, competition law, and the law of warfare. There are no prerequisites to take the course. Guest lecturers will be invited to give papers and presentations. The course will be substantially different to the seminar given in 2023, and build on a monograph in progress.
Teachers:
  • Nicolas Petit (European University Institute)
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
09/01/24 - 19/03/24
Reg. deadline: 15/12/23
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 10
Central European University

Learning by Design 

Tuesdays from 1:30pm - 3:10 pm CET, 2 US credits (4 ECTS). Second in a two-part sequence providing a systematic approach to teaching fundamentals, foc...

Tuesdays from 1:30pm - 3:10 pm CET, 2 US credits (4 ECTS). Second in a two-part sequence providing a systematic approach to teaching fundamentals, focusing on course design and assessments. Participants must previously take Foundations or contact elkanacenter@ceu.edu for exemption. “Learning by Design” is a semester-long, intermediate-level course focused on how students learn and how instructors can facilitate student learning. Building on Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education (which is a prerequisite), it shifts the focus even more firmly from the teacher to the student. In their roles as designer, facilitator (and assessor) of learning, course participants explore how they can guide students in their learning and how to make that learning longer lasting and more significant. During our sessions we will unpack assumptions that surround student learning, delve into theories of how students learn, and explore corresponding principles and approaches to teaching that seek to align learning, teaching, and asessment. We will discuss how to better understand your students, recognize several implications of student diversity for student learning, and explore how to support different types of learners and different types of learning. We will explore, at some length, how to assess student learning, including assessment design, grading, and feedback. Throughout all of this, we will constantly reflect on our own growth as scholars in the process of becoming facilitators of learning.
Teachers:
  • Mátyás Szabó (Central European University)
  • Tamara Kamatovic (Central European University)
Entry requirements: Participants must previously take Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education or contact elkanacenter@ceu.edu for exemption.
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Register to course
Online
09/01/24 - 26/03/24
Reg. deadline: 10/12/23
Credits: 4
N° of Sessions: 12

10 January 2024

Central European University

Democratic and Inclusive Teaching & Learning 

Wednesdays from 1:30pm - 3:10 pm CET, 2 US credits (4 ECTS). Concepts, examples, and classroom-focused strategies for greater inclusion, as well as ho...

Wednesdays from 1:30pm - 3:10 pm CET, 2 US credits (4 ECTS). Concepts, examples, and classroom-focused strategies for greater inclusion, as well as how education can both model and prepare students for democratic participation. Pedagogy and democracy have a long and storied history of interaction. From Socrates' dialogues about citizenship to the role of citizen intellectuals as dissidents in the Eastern Bloc, philosophers, educators, and policymakers have, for centuries, treated teaching as a means through which to impart values related to civic engagement, democratic practices, and broad notions of citizenship. But what would it mean to not just teach democracy, but create democratic classrooms? What would it mean to include all students, rather than only some? This semester-long, seminar-style course introduces participants to the theories and practices of inclusive teaching and of democratic classrooms. Often discussed separately, these two topics often feature similar concerns, classic texts, and teaching methods. This course puts democratic and inclusive teaching in dialogue with each, in addition to exploring the debates and methods within these sub-fields. The course enables participants to explore and apply concepts of inclusion, freedom, equality, self-realization, co-participation, and more, in relation to pedagogical theories, their own teaching philosophies, and their own teaching practices. It considers democracy and its constitutive practices as (potentially) active forces shaping learning environments. Because it is centered on classrooms, rather than on broader higher education institutions, it acknowledges but does not focus on policies beyond the competence of lecturers, such as universities' relationship to the state, funding, or student access. Rather, it provides participants knowledge and tools to create democratic classrooms, including in relation to themes of equity, diversity, and inclusion.
Teachers:
  • Tamara Kamatovic (Central European University)
  • Michael Kozakowski (Central European University)
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Register to course
Online
10/01/24 - 27/03/24
Reg. deadline: 10/12/23
Credits: 4
N° of Sessions: 12

15 January 2024

Central European University

Supervising Undergraduate Research 

Mondays from 8:50-10:30 am CET, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Learn, reflect, and apply effective strategies for undergraduate research supervision. Academ...

Mondays from 8:50-10:30 am CET, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Learn, reflect, and apply effective strategies for undergraduate research supervision. Academic Supervision involves a relationship between attentive supervisor(s) and active engagement and contribution from student(s). The role of the supervisor in helping students to improve their performance is clear, but the way in which such discussions are held is more elusive. Given that supervision is an essential and integral part of the undergraduate research experience, students must gain advice and feedback from their supervisors at each stage of their work. Supervisors are very aware of the need for excellence and efficiency in supervising each individual student. This course is designed to provide opportunities for reflection on supervision strategies to improve your practice. Participants will be encouraged to think more deeply about supervision at undergraduate level and offered opportunities to try out a range of supervision strategies. Small group work will allow participants to reflect on their own practice, share their thoughts within a smaller group of colleagues and then consolidate these ideas and strategies with the whole group. Interactive exercises will be used to create a friendly atmosphere that is conducive to sharing perspectives. Role playing will capture the immediacy of experiential learning, surfacing not only implicit thinking and assumptions about supervision but also hidden feelings and emotions during the supervision process.
Teachers:
  • Yurgos Politis (Central European University)
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Register to course
Online
15/01/24 - 19/02/24
Reg. deadline: 10/12/23
Credits: 2
N° of Sessions: 6

16 January 2024

Hertie School

Introduction to teaching in higher education

The course introduces participants to the theory and practice of teaching in higher education. They can apply what they have learned in practical exer...

The course introduces participants to the theory and practice of teaching in higher education. They can apply what they have learned in practical exercises, for example through individual teaching sessions. This is a block seminar over several days (16 January 9.30am-1pm, 17 January 2-6pm, 18 January 3-6.30pm & 19 January 9.30am-5.30 pm, plus micro-teaching session on 23 & 24 January). Instructor: Dr. Annika Zorn. More information here: https://www.hertie-school.org/en/phd/phd-research/doctoral-course-offerings/introduction-to-teaching-in-higher-education
Entry requirements: little or no teaching experience
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
On site
16/01/24 - 24/01/24
Reg. deadline: 01/11/23
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 4

08 April 2024

Central European University

Inquiry-Based Learning: Approaches for Active Learning 

Mondays from 10:50 am - 12:30 pm CET, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Learn how to design and facilitate structured debates, project-based learning, simulations...

Mondays from 10:50 am - 12:30 pm CET, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Learn how to design and facilitate structured debates, project-based learning, simulations/role playing, and experiential learning. A constant challenge that teachers/educators face is keeping their students’ interest in a given topic and getting them actively engaged in the learning process. Inquiry-based learning (IBL) empowers students to take control of their learning by allowing them to actively engage with the teaching materials. Students’ ideas, opinions, questions, and observations are central to the learning experience. IBL encourages students to be critical thinkers and problem solvers. Knowledge is constructed through experience, experimentation, and exploration. This six-week course will allow participants to explore IBL in some depth, starting with what it is, the benefits of adopting this active learning approach, the activities associated with it and reflections on situations it might be appropriate for participants to adopt. We will then discuss the model of four levels of inquiry (confirmation, structured, guided, open), and discuss examples from each one of them. This will be followed by an in-depth examination of four approaches through which IBL is commonly applied, providing participants the opportunity to learn how to design and facilitate structured debates, project-based learning, simulations/role playing, and experiential learning.
Teachers:
  • Yurgos Politis (Central European University)
Entry requirements: Prerequisites: the current version of Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education (YELC 6101 and 6103) and Learning by Design (YELC 6105) or the older version of Foundations (CATL 6007)
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Register to course
Online
08/04/24 - 13/05/24
Reg. deadline: 22/03/24
Credits: 2
N° of Sessions: 6

09 April 2024

Central European University

Creating a Teaching Portfolio 

Tuesdays from 1:30-3:10, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Guided creation of a teaching portfolio, primarily using materials from previous CEU teaching courses. ...

Tuesdays from 1:30-3:10, 1 US credit (2 ECTS). Guided creation of a teaching portfolio, primarily using materials from previous CEU teaching courses. (Foundations and Learning by Design are generally prerequisites).
Teachers:
  • Michael Kozakowski (Central European University)
Entry requirements: Foundations and Learning by Design are generally prerequisites.
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Register to course
Online
09/04/24 - 14/05/24
Reg. deadline: 22/03/24
Credits: 2
N° of Sessions: 6

21 May 2024

European University Institute

Antitrust Renaissance

This seminar presents the building blocks of a forthcoming book by Professors Petit and Schrepel. The book proposes a new formula for competition law ...

This seminar presents the building blocks of a forthcoming book by Professors Petit and Schrepel. The book proposes a new formula for competition law and policy. There are today enough empirical observations showing that established models of competition policy do not apprehend the modern complexity of competition across firms, markets and industries. The lost diagnosis accuracy is a source of legal and policy error; an update in our understanding of how economic agents compete in a technology-driven environment is needed. Grounded in empirics and in a review of the legal, economic, and technical literature on industrial change and innovation, the book proposes a “renaissance” of competition policy around several key propositions. In particular, Petit and Schrepel suggest that uncertainty, as much as rivalry, is key to competition, that innovation is an input equally important to competition as industry structure, or that firm and industry level evolution is a good metric for assessing the impact of antitrust law and policy. Finally, the seminar discusses adaptations to current antitrust institutions and procedures, and the appropriate scope of a complexity-minded antitrust policy This intensive course seeks to lay the ground for the development of a more explicit theory of antitrust law. It studies antitrust laws’ principles of action (firm size, economic concentration, market power, etc.), function (rivalry, uncertainty), limits (error costs and division of labor), methods (facts and principles), metaphysics (a priori knowledge), epistemology (economics schools of thoughts), ontology (firm, market, coordinated and unilateral conduct, etc.), mobilization (private and public), legitimacy (expert and popular), norms (welfare, choice, justice), and remediation (prevention and restoration). The course’s ambition is mostly descriptive. The point is to describe the anatomy, biology and behavior of our antitrust laws. The course assumes that it is intellectually useful to break down antitrust laws in ways that describe their structure and parts, mechanics and chemistry, and actual operation. In so doing, this intensive course seeks to show many versions of antitrust laws are possible, in ways far more diversified than the binary policy reform options often vindicated in the public conversation. The focus is on US and EU antitrust laws.
Teachers:
  • Thibault Schrepel ()
  • Nicolas Petit (European University Institute)
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Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
21/05/24 - 23/05/24
Reg. deadline: 22/04/24
Credits: 3
N° of Sessions: 3