CIVICA ESR
COURSE CATALOGUE

30 November 2022

The London School of Economics and Political Sciences

Social Media for Researchers

This workshop gives students practical tips for using an array of social media tools for advancing their careers. We will look first at social media a...

This workshop gives students practical tips for using an array of social media tools for advancing their careers. We will look first at social media as a tool for learning: a user-friendly technique for staying across relevant developments within our chosen sectors/policy debates. We will also examine how social media – and, in particular, Twitter and Linked In – can be used to cultivate professional connections. Finally, we will look at how students can use social media as a research tool.
read more


Register to course
Online
30/11/22 - 30/11/22
Reg. deadline: 30/11/22
Credits: 0

07 December 2022

The London School of Economics and Political Sciences

Virtual Presence

This workshop focuses on getting you comfortable with virtual meetings so that you can maximize your virtual presence. We explore some of the technica...

This workshop focuses on getting you comfortable with virtual meetings so that you can maximize your virtual presence. We explore some of the technical aspects of virtual delivery, including lighting, backgrounds, and how to make the camera your friend. We also look at how to use other tools at your disposal - such as your voice and your words - to help ensure that you come across as confident and engaging. Trainer: Delia Lloyd Delia Lloyd is a writer and communications expert based in London. She holds a PhD in political science from Stanford University and has taught public policy and international development at MIT and The University of Chicago. Most recently, Delia was the Head of Policy and Research Insight at BBC Media Action, the BBC's International development charity, where she was in charge of commissioning, editing and disseminating policy and research outputs.
read more


Register to course
Online
07/12/22 - 07/12/22
Reg. deadline: 07/12/22
Credits: 0
The London School of Economics and Political Sciences

Keep Calm and Study On: Techniques for Managing Stress

Do you believe stress is an inevitable part of doing a PhD? With multiple deadlines, performance pressure, escalating tuition fees, and an uncertain j...

Do you believe stress is an inevitable part of doing a PhD? With multiple deadlines, performance pressure, escalating tuition fees, and an uncertain job market, it isno wonder that students are reportedly experiencing higher levels of stress and anxiety. This workshop will examine how sustained periods of stress actually impact the mind and body. We will also consider hoe specific thought patterns contribute to this and explore which tools you can incorporate into your daily routine to help reduce stress. The course will cover: • The prevalence of stress in academia• The physiology of stress (The Fight/Flight Response mechanism and TheRelaxation Response)• The role of thought processes in contributing to stress• Tools to minimize the symptoms of stress Trainer: Dr Serena Sharma Serena has spent two decades in higher education as both a student and an academic. Since completing her PhD, she has held academic positions at the University of Oxford, King’s College London and, presently, the London School of Economics. Through her own personal experiences in academia—from study, research and publishing to teaching and supervising—Serena has observed a significant gap in the level of support offered to students in coping with the unique pressures that arise in academic environments. With this in mind Serena has created a series of workshops dedicated to promoting wellness in research students.
read more


Register to course
Online
07/12/22 - 07/12/22
Reg. deadline: 07/12/22
Credits: 0

10 January 2023

European University Institute

Practicum in Reproducible Research Methods

This course walks you through all the steps involved in a complex collaborative reproducible research project, from thinking up a problem worth studyi...

This course walks you through all the steps involved in a complex collaborative reproducible research project, from thinking up a problem worth studying to pre-registering your design to collecting and analyzing your data and writing up and posting your results. You will practice these steps using real data collected and provided by the instructor. To master the skills involved, you will work in teams and hand in bi-weekly homework assignments. This is a fast-paced hands-on course that requires background in statistical methods and R. All other skills will be taught in the course by the instructor.
Teachers:
  • Miriam Golden (European University Institute)
Entry requirements: Basic knowledge of statistics; Familiarity with R
Assessment: Four group homework assignments
read more


Register to course
Online
10/01/23 - 14/03/23
Reg. deadline: 15/12/22
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 10
European University Institute

Causal inference

The objective is to learn how statistical methods can help us to draw causal claims about phenomena of interest. Participants will be introduced into ...

The objective is to learn how statistical methods can help us to draw causal claims about phenomena of interest. Participants will be introduced into an authoritative framework of causal inference in social sciences, i.e. the potential outcomes framework.
read more


Register to course
Online
10/01/23 - 14/03/23
Reg. deadline: 15/12/22
Credits: 0
N° of Sessions: 10
Central European University

Democratic and Inclusive Teaching and Learning (YELC 6158)

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/democratic-and-inclusive-teaching-and-learning-yelc6158 Pedagogy and democracy have a long and storied h...

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/democratic-and-inclusive-teaching-and-learning-yelc6158 Pedagogy and democracy have a long and storied history of interaction. From Socrates' dialogues about citizenship to the role of citizen intellectuals as dissidents in the Eastern Bloc, philosophers, educators, and policymakers have, for centuries, treated teaching as a means through which to impart values related to civic engagement, democratic practices, and broad notions of citizenship. But what would it mean to not just teach democracy, but create democratic classrooms? What would it mean to include all students, rather than only some? This senester-long, seminar-style course introduces participants to the theories and practices of inclusive teaching and of democratic classrooms. Often discussed separately, these two topics often feature similar concerns, classic texts, and teaching methods. This course puts democratic and inclusive teaching in dialogue with each, in addition to exploring the debates and methods within these sub-fields. The course enables participants to explore and apply concepts of inclusion, freedom, equality, self-realization, co-participation, and more, in relation to pedagogical theories, their own teaching philosophies, and their own teaching practices. It considers democracy and its constitutive practices as (potentially) active forces shaping learning environments. Because it is centered on classrooms, rather than on broader higher education institutions, it acknowledges but does not focus on policies beyond the competence of lecturers, such as universities' relationship to the state, funding, or student access. Rather, it provides participants knowledge and tools to create democratic classrooms, including in relation to themes of equity, diversity, and inclusion. This online course takes place on 12 Tuesdays, from 1:30 – 3:10 pm (Vienna time).
Teachers:
  • Tamara Kamatovic (Central European University)
  • Michael Kozakowski (Central European University)
read more


Register to course
Online
10/01/23 - 28/03/23
Reg. deadline: 18/12/22
Credits: 4

11 January 2023

Central European University

Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/foundations-teaching-higher-education-yelc6101-and-yelc6103 Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education ...

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/foundations-teaching-higher-education-yelc6101-and-yelc6103 Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education is a semester-long, foundational course for doctoral students preparing for their role as teaching assistants and future scholar-teachers. This course also forms the basis of the comprehensive certificate program for teaching in higher education offered by the Yehuda Elkana Center for Teaching, Learning, and Higher Education Research (The Elkana Center). This 3-credit course consists of both a seminar (YELC 6101) and practicum (6103). Participants must enroll in and successfully complete both the seminar and practicum in order to pass the course. Doctoral students are encouraged to enroll no later than the semester in which they serve as teaching assistants. The course fosters an understanding of the university teacher as a professional scholar ready to engage in teaching informed by research, models of good practice, a spirit of inquiry, and critical intellectual engagement. Our approach to teaching in higher education combines knowledge of theoretical foundations, a strong practice orientation, and an appreciation for collaborative, inquiry-driven, and technology-enhanced learning environments. This course will allow for the development of your own teaching approaches and values through a combination of reading, reflective writing, and practical tasks. You will gain a research-driven foundation for your work as twenty-first century scholar-teachers through the study of key issues and experimentation in a variety of approaches. Thus, the main goals of the course are as follows: To facilitate preparation for future academic careers by providing participants with an intellectual and practical grounding in the skills associated with academic teaching; To develop effective teaching approaches and techniques in the context of a class session; To begin linking the design, facilitation, and assessment of a class session with the broader course and curriculum in which we teach; To develop participants’ critical self-awareness of how to grow and develop as a scholar-teacher. “This online course takes place on 11 Wednesdays, from 1:30-4:30 pm (Vienna time)
Teachers:
  • Tamara Kamatovic (Central European University)
  • Matyas Szabo (Central European University)
read more


Register to course
Online
11/01/23 - 29/03/23
Reg. deadline: 18/12/22
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 11

16 January 2023

European University Institute

Law and Technology

The ambition of this course is to broadly discuss the evaluation and regulation of technology. The course explores the field of “law and technology” i...

The ambition of this course is to broadly discuss the evaluation and regulation of technology. The course explores the field of “law and technology” in legal scholarship, its history, epistemology, ontology, and axiology. The course discusses issues such as when there is a “need for law” (Tranter, 2011), the “regulability” of technology, regulatory pacing, “compartimentalization” of legal approaches, cyberlaw, lawmaking by courts v legislatures, and moral objections to technology. The course encompasses technology in a wide sense that is digital, mechanical, material and chemical technology. Legal history will also be looked at to discuss innovations like the printing press, radio broadcasting and automation. The course is relevant to many specific fields of law, like constitutional and administrative law, free speech, liability law, intellectual property, privacy protection, competition law, and the law of warfare. There are no prerequisites to take the course. Guest lecturers will be invited to give papers and presentations. The course will be substantially different to the seminar given in 2021, and build on a monograph in progress.
Teachers:
  • Nicolas Petit (European University Institute)
read more


Registration for this course is no longer possible
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
16/01/23 - 17/03/23
Reg. deadline: 09/01/23
Credits: 6
N° of Sessions: 10

17 January 2023

European University Institute

Legal Transplants and Policy Diffusion/Transfer

The notion of ‘legal transplants’ refers to the way legal systems incorporate ‘foreign’ elements, for example by copying the text of a foreign piece o...

The notion of ‘legal transplants’ refers to the way legal systems incorporate ‘foreign’ elements, for example by copying the text of a foreign piece of legislation but also other forms of emulation (eg, related to case law and legal thinking). The literature on this topic has both a positive and a normative dimension: the former analyses how far legal transplants have been a frequent feature of legal systems, while the latter analyses how far they are a useful way of improving one’s law. It also has strong methodological interest as it discusses, for example, how far a foreign legal element can function outside its original social, cultural and political context. For all of these aspects, it is also interesting to note that, outside legal scholarship, the notions of ‘policy diffusion’ and ‘policy transfer’ discuss similar topics, often making use of empirical methods. This short seminar will introduce researchers from law, and possibly other departments, to these debates. This may appeal to researchers that use any of these concepts in their research but also to others who have a more general interest in legal evolution and law reform.
Teachers:
  • Mathias Siems (European University Institute)
read more


Register to course
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
17/01/23 - 20/01/23
Tuesday, January 17: 10 – 13, 14 – 16 Friday, Jan...
Reg. deadline: 10/01/23
Credits: 3
N° of Sessions: 4

05 April 2023

Central European University

Learning by Design (YELC 6105)

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/learning-design-yelc6105 “Learning by Design” is a semester-long, intermediate-level course focused on h...

Course description: https://elkana.ceu.edu/learning-design-yelc6105 “Learning by Design” is a semester-long, intermediate-level course focused on how students learn and how instructors can facilitate student learning. Building on Foundations of Teaching in Higher Education (which is a prerequisite), it shifts the focus even more firmly from the teacher to the student. In their roles as designer, facilitator (and assessor) of learning, course participants explore how they can guide students in their learning and how to make that learning longer lasting and more significant. During our sessions we will unpack assumptions that surround student learning, delve into theories of how students learn, and explore corresponding principles and approaches to teaching that seek to align learning, teaching, and assessment. We will discuss how to better understand your students, recognize several implications of student diversity for student learning, and explore how to support different types of learners and different types of learning. We will explore, at some length, how to assess student learning, including assessment design, grading, and feedback. Throughout all of this, we will constantly reflect on our own growth as scholars in the process of becoming facilitators of learning. This online course takes place on 11 Wednesdays, from 1:30-3:10 pm (Vienna time).
Teachers:
  • Tamara Kamatovic (Central European University)
  • Matyas Szabo (Central European University)
read more


Register to course
Online
05/04/23 - 14/06/23
Reg. deadline: 26/03/23
Credits: 4
N° of Sessions: 11

16 May 2023

European University Institute

Antitrust Theory

Antitrust law is an undertheorized field. The absence of a theory of what antitrust laws are about, and how, why, and when they do what they do is pro...

Antitrust law is an undertheorized field. The absence of a theory of what antitrust laws are about, and how, why, and when they do what they do is problematic. Broad claims for and against antitrust law reform are aired every time a legitimacy crisis hits the field. There is no testable way to validate or invalidate the claims made about antitrust law reform. This intensive course seeks to lay the ground for the development of a more explicit theory of antitrust law. It studies antitrust laws’ principles of action (firm size, economic concentration, market power, etc.), function (rivalry, uncertainty), limits (error costs and division of labor), methods (facts and principles), metaphysics (a priori knowledge), epistemology (economics schools of thoughts), ontology (firm, market, coordinated and unilateral conduct, etc.), mobilization (private and public), legitimacy (expert and popular), norms (welfare, choice, justice), and remediation (prevention and restoration). The course’s ambition is mostly descriptive. The point is to describe the anatomy, biology and behavior of our antitrust laws. The course assumes that it is intellectually useful to break down antitrust laws in ways that describe their structure and parts, mechanics and chemistry, and actual operation. In so doing, this intensive course seeks to show many versions of antitrust laws are possible, in ways far more diversified than the binary policy reform options often vindicated in the public conversation. The focus is on US and EU antitrust laws.
Teachers:
  • Nicolas Petit (European University Institute)
read more


Register to course
Hybrid (class + online simultaneous)
16/05/23 - 18/05/23
Reg. deadline: 09/05/23
Credits: 3
N° of Sessions: 3